After playing 2K12 for a few minutes, it was obvious that there were some widespread changes once again. Although last year’s game physics were pretty awesome, posting up was a little too difficult, speed dribbling was a little too effective, and crossovers were a little too devastating against other users. Not anymore.



You know how in most basketball games—well, probably in most sports games in general—there’s a kind of invisible wall surrounding the court/playing field, so if you’re controlling a player and run him out of bounds, he’ll just be stopped by a supernatural force? That doesn’t really exist anymore. If you run a defender into the scorer’s table, just like in real life, he’ll jump up and hop into the crowd, then gather himself and get back into the action. If you run him into the sidelines, he’ll leap over the folks lucky enough to be seated courtside before curbing his momentum and turning around. Cool, no?



There are other new features in the game, such as having the ability to interact with fans, and shot reviews. At one point during one of the games, my opponent went for a three-pointer as the clock zeroed out. He nailed the basket, but it was so close to the wire that the shot went up for review. It was ultimately ruled against — the shot was close, but we all saw on the replay that the ball left his fingers after the clock ran out — and I won because of it. It’s a nice added touch for a simulation that already receives high marks from fans and critics.



Rebounding was long a thing that, once a player was in his rebounding animation, that ball was secure. Upgrades to the collision system means the ball is in play unless the guy really rips it down or is a totally superior rebounder. I saw it in a huge way when Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, the 6-1 guard on the 1994 Denver Nuggets, followed his miss and even beat Hakeem Olajuwon to the ball. In the past, the encounter would stop there. Here, because of The Dream's size and rebounding ability, he knocked it free and gathered it up. Second chances like these can favor the novice and keep runs from getting out of hand.

The second is a new post-up control, which does away with last year's unwieldy, dual-trigger command to get a big man to back down his defender. Now it's on triangle/Y, and one touch gets his back to the basket, or gets him to face up. In addition to making half-court basketball less complicated, it also frees up the triggers, as modifiers, for those who are comfortable exploring a new range of post moves, counter-moves, and counters to those counters. It also means players like Al Jefferson, who post up their man, then quickly face up and drive, are represented more accurately and are more useful to your offense.



The on-the-fly commentators are perhaps the most impressive to date in a sports sim. Not only do they call the game, but they inject history and stories about the players into their commentary. I think the aspect that blew me away the most was when one of the announcers was discussing Shaq's retirement and was interrupted when Ewing threw down a monster jam. Instead of just moving on, he actually went back to the thought and continued the story seamlessly when the action on the court resumed a more natural pace.



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{picture#https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-AgIZYN7u_Hg/VZvLmrA0hpI/AAAAAAAARt8/mscbLJ1All4/profile%2Bpic.jpg} JP Canonigo is a historian, professional blogger and copywriter, online content specialist, copywriter, video game junkie, sports fanatic and jack-of-all trades. {facebook#http://www.facebook.com/istoryadista} {twitter#http://www.twitter.com/jpthehistorian} {google#http://plus.google.com/+JPSakuragi}
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